Posts tagged “Unbearable Dumbness

It’s the Return of Catwoman the Contortionist

DC released their September solicitations this week, and the cover for Catwoman #0 has born reactions that are nothing short of hysterically funny.  Check out this slideshow of mockery that had me just guffawing, the tears streaming down my face.  I’d considered posting my own reaction to the obscene ridiculousness of the cover, but then there are plenty others who have already summed it up, and so eloquently, too.

I almost feel bad for Guillem March.  I’m not sure the anger is really warranted toward him; if anything, the blame and frustration should be placed on the editor who OK’d this.  That editor was not doing their job … or, perhaps this is exactly what they believe their job to be—to spurn enough fury to get the Internet talking, bringing attention to this book, getting Catwoman “out there.”  For all the unbelievably wrong reasons, of course.

But in a week that has seen some other depressing things and disgusting behavior toward women, there’s still at least one thing to celebrate.

Apologies for the massive linkage, but in lieu of reviews this week, this is some important reading.

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Just a Small Part of Why I Love Greg Rucka

I read this today and just had to share.  Greg Rucka has always been one of my favorite writers; I started reading Elektra because of him, and his Wonder Woman run still can’t be beat in my eyes.  I’m an avid follower of his web comic, Lady Sabre & the Pirates of the Ineffable Aether, as well as various other projects and minis.

So when I came across this piece of badassery, it just further cemented my loyalty to this incredible writer.

You tell them, Greg Rucka!

Also, here’s a somewhat related supplemental reading, if you feel like.  Definitely worth checking out.


“Epic Fail”

The Nielsen ratings are in for DC’s New 52, and the results are … pretty depressing, though not surprising.

Read about it here.

Kind of rips you apart a little, doesn’t it?

 


It’s a crisis there’s no Crisis!

So apparently Dan Didio said something over Facebook about how none of the Crises ever happened.

Didio on Crisis

Can anyone else make any sense of this?  I must be missing something.  If Final Crisis never happened, then what caused Bruce to “die” and Dick to take up the mantle of Batman?  That’s already been referenced in several books, and Grant Morrison’s run is still technically happening and referencing itself as it goes along, so we know it’s still canon … yet it’s not?  Can anyone help me out here?

He went on to “clarify” (I use the term loosely):

Didio on Crises

Ohhhh, I get it now.

… Except that I don’t.

I would say, given that the entire initiative of the New 52 was to wipe the slate completely clean in order to erase and/or make continuity “less confusing” for new readers, the fact that now we have even MORE of a convoluted backstory to all of this, where neither reader nor editorial apparently knows what’s sticking and what isn’t, means that after only one month of the reboot, it’s already a failure story-wise.  None of this makes any sense.  I can’t say I really expected it to, but it’s making even less sense than I thought it would.  And it’s just plain annoying.  Way to make this stuff up as you go along, guys.

On the bright side, at least Gail Simone still makes me laugh.

Gail Tweet


And they wonder why “girls don’t read comics”?

Actually, I should probably change that title to “why MORE girls don’t read comics.”  Clearly, many of us do, although it’s getting increasingly more difficult….

No reviews from me this week, as I haven’t had a chance to read the stuff I wanted to review.  Instead, I leave you with this very striking post from Laura Hudson at Comics Alliance about DC’s latest fail.  It’s worth a read.  Warning that it contains spoilers to Red Hood and the Outlaws #1 and Catwoman #1.  I would also say that some of the imagery might be deemed “NSFW,” which is telling when you figure that the images have only been taken from the aforementioned books.  Kind of messed up, no?

Have a good weekend, all.  Pick up Wonder Woman #1 and the latest Children’s Crusade.


Reblogged: DC Comics SDCC panels: uncomfortable questions about female creators/characters

Reblogged from DC Women Kicking AssThe DC Comics panels at SDCC have been filled with what I’m being told are uncomfortable and awkward moments around the issues of female creators and characters… [read more].

That’s some seriously screwed up stuff right there.  I wish I were at that panel to cheer this woman on.


1988 called. It wants Rob Liefeld back.

Hahaaha, oh my.  This is getting worse and worse.  Rob Liefeld on a new Hawk and Dove series?  I just might have to buy that.  The 90s are coming … I’m getting my suspenders ready!

As I try to quell my heartache over all of the DC news this week, I offer you some blurb reviews.  I didn’t realize until I was finished that they’re all Marvel.  There’s a chance that’ll become more often the case in the coming months.

And also, let me clarify one thing:  despite what the last issue of the newsletter said, “Suicide Girls” was damn well NOT my pick of the week.  You can thank my comic shop colleagues for that loving display of antagonism and embarrassment … but I suppose I had it coming.  :)
  

The Mighty Thor #2The Mighty Thor #2 – I was surprised to like this book.  Given my tendency to dislike Matt Fraction’s writing, my expectations for this title weren’t very high.  The main factor that convinced me to pick it up is Olivier Coipel pulling art duties, and I was right to fall for it, because he shines as bright as ever.  His crisp style does the same wonders for Thor here as it did during Coipel’s run with JMS not long ago, and his representation of the Silver Surfer is seriously awesome.  Story-wise, it’s nothing particularly ground-breaking yet, but entertaining enough without feeling as lethargic as I usually find Fraction to be (more on that below, unfortunately).  The plot involves Thor getting hurt while retrieving the World Seed, while the Silver Surfer warns earth of Galactus’ impending arrival.  So far there’s a nice split of focus between Thor, Odin, Loki, and Sif (my favorite—I bet that doesn’t surprise you), and it’s just fallen into this groove of “light reading” for me.  The title doesn’t seem to cross over much into Journey into Mystery so far, which is the better book of the two, but I wonder if that doesn’t have to change at some point.  I’m sticking with this and drooling over Coipel’s artistic candy for now.
  

Fear Itself Book ThreeFear Itself #3 – **SPOILERS**
I knew I shouldn’t be reading this.  I knew I shouldn’t have bothered, but here I am, never one to resist the horror.  My warm feelings for Matt Fraction don’t extend far beyond the above Mighty Thor post, readers, because—I’m sorry—this is some lazy, dumb shit we’ve got going on here.  Okay—I’m going to completely avoid all the other nitpicks I have with this issue and just focus on the one big one, which is BUCKY.  Poor, poor, dear old Bucky.  It’s a testament to the languid storytelling here that by the end of the issue, I wasn’t even sure if he was actually dead.  I had to take to the internet and get other people’s reactions in order to know for sure what was going on.  Even the incredible Stuart Immonen couldn’t save this for me, and from what I’ve read, I wasn’t the only one left confused.  But, yes—it’s confirmed that Bucky is very dead.  Again.  And I cannot for the life of me understand why they thought this would be a good idea.  So Marvel wants Steve back as Cap?  Okay, fine.  Let’s do it.  But that is absolutely no reason for Bucky to have to die.  Marvel brought him back against a bunch of pissing and moaning from the fans, gave him to Brubaker who turned him into a really great character and let the spotlight shine on him for a couple of years, won all the fans over and now they’re taking all that and throwing it away just for one poorly-constructed scene in an event book.  It makes no sense.  It doesn’t sell any extra copies of the book, it didn’t add anything to the scene, and it didn’t take away from how blah and boring the rest of the story has been.  It was nothing.  Just a nothing scene.  Despite my love for the character, I felt absolutely nothing reading this.  Not to mention it made no sense at all to keep him completely out of the first two books, then turn around in issue three and off him out of nowhere.  WHAT?  That is damn LAZINESS, Matt Fraction—LAZY.  YOU MAKE KITTY CRY.
  

Daken: Dark Wolverine #9.1Daken: Dark Wolverine #9.1 – Rob Williams writes this issue in place of the tag team of Daniel Way and Marjorie Liu.  I’m not sure if this is a permanent change or just a fill in—I’m pretty sure I read somewhere that Marjorie Liu won’t be co-writing anymore, but I could be wrong.  At any rate, the title’s been a little hit and miss for me.  I enjoyed most of the earlier stuff, but as soon as the crossover with X-23 happened, I got a little turned off.  With that done and over now, all of the attention is rightfully back on Daken.  Despite the “point one” suggestion that this is a good jumping on point to read the book, it really wouldn’t hurt to go out of your way and pick up the stuff that came before it.  It’ll only give you a fuller sense of the story and a better understanding of Daken as a character.  Issue #9.1 mainly deals with Daken ascertaining his dominion over … well, himself, really—who he is, what he’s about, and the fact that he’s not Wolverine.  As the issue opens with one of Daken’s victims chastising him with the reality that all he ever does is destroy—never does he create anything—Daken actually takes it to heart and decides to act.  How he acts, I’ll leave it for you to see, but something kind of falls flat this issue.  While the story idea isn’t terrible, it’s also not particularly strong, and just feels a bit recycled.  That said, the impression we’re left with is that Daken will be launching into something better moving forward.  Ron Garney on art is, like the story itself, hit and miss, but I haven’t given up on this yet.  Let’s see what the next few issues bring.
  

Uncanny X-Force #11Uncanny X-Force #11 – The Apocalypse personality continues to cause trouble for our dear Warren Worthington in the lastest issue of what has easily become one of my favorite comics on the shelf, and it’s up to the rest of the X-Force team to cure Warren of what ails him.  Unfortunately, curing him means trusting in Dark Beast of the AoA and following him back into his own time in order to procure the life seed (what’s with the “seed” theme this month?) that will temper the Apocalypse personality within Warren.  The character interaction here is great, not only among team members, but also with the surprise guests that pop up from the Age of Apocalypse timeline.  You know when I said that X-Men: Legacy was the best X-book out there right now, and that the rest is toilet paper?  Well, at the time I said that, I’d apparently forgotten about Uncanny X-Force.  This title has been oh-my-word good since issue one, and Rick Remender is showing no signs of slowing down.  This is the quality of writing—character, plot, and setting—that I look for in every book I pick up each month, but only seem to get in a handful.  If that.  I’ll take this over the 800 Fear Itself tie-ins any day.