Posts tagged “Birds of Prey

Turkey Day Reviews

Captain America #4Captain America #4
Written by Ed Brubaker
Illustrated by Steve McNiven
Publisher:  Marvel Comics
Price:  $3.99

 

Awwww, Marvel.  Why?

I started picking up this series because I adore Steve Rogers as a character, and I’d heard such great things about Brubaker’s writing of Cap.  When I read that McNiven was doing the pencils, I jumped all over this like the obsessor that I am.  I looooooooovvvvveee McNiven’s stuff, and to me, him and Cap are a match made in heaven.  This book made me so happy.

I speak in the past tense, because apparently McNiven is no longer on this title as of issue #7.  His replacement?  Alan Davis.

I don’t know if this is a permanent change or if Davis is filling in for a couple of arcs; the solicitations aren’t clear, and the switch doesn’t appear to be addressed in detail anywhere.  I couldn’t give less of a fig for Alan Davis.  I have nothing against him personally and I’m sure he’s a gentleman; it’s just that his art does absolutely nothing for me.  At ALL.  I simply dislike his style, and that’s really gonna kill this book for me.  It’s a shame, because I’ve really enjoyed the four issues to date.

Don’t be fooled by the odd cover (Marvel seems especially preoccupied with phallic concepts lately); what lies beneath the title page here is good stuff.  Brubaker pairs together past and future in a seamless and engaging way, introducing old characters and new to propel the story forward and keep the engine humming.  What makes me particularly happy with Brubaker is his track record in writing female characters—basically, he knows how to.  You might laugh at that, but let’s take a look at his record—Selina Kyle, Black Widow, now Sharon Carter—it is, sadly, shockingly rare to write a string like that without some blunders along the way, but the man does it seemingly effortlessly.  Yes, I’m in love with his Cap, but watching Sharon Carter spar with Baron Zemo and lay an eloquent dropkick on the guy is, let’s face it, pretty damn awesome.  And having McNiven illustrate that wonderfully-constructed scene?  Icing on the ass-kicking cake, my friends.

I’m not sure how long I’m going to stick around once Alan Davis comes aboard this book.  A part of me wants to drop it out of principle alone; it feels like Marvel can never get their act together as far as keeping creative teams on titles for any longer than a story arc at a time, and that’s bothersome.  Things shouldn’t be that difficult, and as a consumer, I’m looking for consistency.  There are some exceptions—no matter how late Avengers: Children’s Crusade is, I will always buy it, and no matter how many artists come and go on Journey into Mystery, Kieron Gillen will always have my dollar—but this should remain the exception and not the rule.  I wouldn’t want to be accused of enabling.

We’ll see where Cap lands in a couple of months’ time.  Maybe Davis will be off before I know it, replaced with someone else’s work to lure me in against my will, but in order for me to continue buying Captain America at four bucks a pop, I’m gonna need both pieces and I demand better.

 

Birds of Prey #3Birds of Prey #3
Written by Duane Swierczynski
Illustrated by Jesus Saiz
Publisher:  DC Comics
Price:  $2.99

 

Oohhh … ouch.  My pride.  God. I’m so ashamed and my pride is so sore, because … because … I am LOVING THIS BOOK!
 
There—I said it.  And I KNOW what you’re thinking … and I’m so ashamed.  *Hangs head to the floor*

I just … it’s … it’s actually really good.  I read the first issue and I was all begrudging about it, and then I read the second issue and I was like oh … uh oh … maybe this could go somewhere, but NO!  I’M NEVER GONNA ADMIT IT!  And then I read the third issue and … and … oh, Swierczynski’s won me over completely and now I’m scum.  *Sobbing*

What convinced me to keep reading were the rumors that Barbara Gordon would wind up on the team.  If you read my bitter condemnation review of issue one, a huge reason why I decried this book was because the relationship between Dinah and Babs was seemingly being downplayed/ignored/retconned.  But then I kept hearing such positive reviews of the title from critics whose opinions I respect, and all might not be as it seems within the next few issues.  So I read #2 and #3, and … here I am, eating my words.  Mr. Swierczynski, I owe you apology.  Your book just kicked me in the face, and it feels so good.

And wow, Jesus Saiz … I can’t compliment him enough.  His artwork is so skilled and GORGEOUS.  It’s so wonderful and clear and … you know, there’s a scene in this issue with an explosion and Black Canary, Starling, Katana, and Poison Ivy are flung through the air from the force of it.  And—can you believe—not a single contorted spine, not a single sleazy upskirt or shot of cleavage, not a single broken back.  I … I didn’t know comics like this could actually exist!  I LOVE YOU, JESUS SAIZ!  Never, ever change!

So I humbly retract my earlier assessment of this title.  It’s not quite the Birds of Prey I once knew and hoped for; it’s not the team I fell in love with.  But I’m having an easier time now taking THIS team of Birds for what they are, and it’s legitimately good, enjoyable, and fun to read.  With each issue, I’m learning to drop my preconceived notions and favoritism.  No lie, it’s been tough.  I’m all set in my comics ways and stuff, you know?  But for at least the next few issues, I’m on board with this book.  Please, please don’t let me down, Swierczynski.

 

Supergirl #3Supergirl #3
Written by Michael Green & Mike Johnson
Illustrated by Mahmud Asrar
Publisher:  DC Comics
Price:  $2.99

 

Hello, Supergirl—it’s nice to finally meet you.

The Super family of books have always been tough sales for me.  I was never one for Superman; he’s always felt flat to me, and I’d mostly steered clear of his side of the comics racks until last year when I started picking up Jeff Lemire’s Superboy (which I miss desperately).  But Powergirl has never lured me, and Supergirl’s (re-)introduction in the Superman/Batman book a few years ago flew right over my head.  For whatever reason, I just never cared enough to give Kara much of a chance.  With the New 52, I decided I’d change that.

So I picked up the first two issues of this title, and for the most part, I really enjoyed them.  A large reason for that is in thanks to the artwork—Mahmud Asrar is, if I may say, pretty incredible.  I don’t think I’ve seen any of his work prior to this, but his soft, watercolory style is a pleasure that leaves my eyes wanting more at the end of every issue.  It’s fluid and beautiful, and I can’t get enough.

Story-wise, this book is conflicting.  On the one hand, I want to say that I’ve enjoyed each read in the moment I’m reading it; on the other hand, I take a step back to think about it and the three issues to date have been extraordinarily decompressed.  I feel like “decompressed” is a word everyone likes to toss around in the comics world these days, so I generally try to avoid it, but it’s very true here.  The first two issues of this title were about Kara crash landing to Earth, being confused, and fighting Superman.  TWO ENTIRE ISSUES of that!  Don’t you think that could have all been accomplished in just one issue?  How many times must we witness Kal and Kara fight and try to “figure things out”?  This aspect of the book—the redundancy and stretching out the story for no reason—bothers me.  If I were a diehard Supergirl fan, I’d be extremely annoyed, because what’s happening to Kara mirrors what’s happening to Barbara over in Batgirl—which is more of the same.  A seemingly unoriginal take.

Despite these criticisms, though, this title is still okay with me overall.  I’m still reading.  Why?  Because I am a new reader of Supergirl, and although I know this story has happened before, I’ve never previously read it myself.  As an experience, it’s still new to me.  I’m finally getting to know a version of Supergirl, and it’s admittedly kind of exciting.  I really want to like her.

So issue three opens up with some backstory regarding Krypton, and we’re finally introduced to a villain for Kara to face on Earth.  I want to say this villain is a bit generic, but Green and Johnson have already managed to make me hate his guts in the span of one issue, so I guess that’s successful.  While we sputter a bit here thanks to that D-word, I’m cautiously optimistic that things will pick up after the first arc.  Green and Johnson always come across well in interviews, expressing enthusiasm for Kara and it sounds like they have some great ideas for this title.  It’s their chance to make her shine, and it’s my chance to let them.  I want to like this—I am liking this, mostly—and I’m hopeful that it only goes upward from here.

 

Until next week, everyone—be safe, and eat lots of turkey!

Happy Thanksgiving


More of the New 52

I’m having a rough go of this DC stuff, guys.  A real rough go.  If I had to pick one book this week to tell you to avoid like the frigging plague, it would be Teen Titans.  Don’t do it to yourself, readers.  You deserve better.

Aquaman #1Aquaman #1
Written by Geoff Johns
Illustrated by Ivan Reis & Joe Prado
Price:  $2.99

 

While That’s E is my LCS, occasional place of employment, and all-around hub of awesome, working in Boston can make it difficult to swing by store hours during the week to pick up comics.  That activity is typically reserved for the weekend when Boyfriend and I—now Fiancé, hip hip!—have the time to chat with our friends behind the counter, praise the latest works we’ve enjoyed, or talk smack about that week’s failures (at which point hilarity and raucous laughter ensue).  But when Wednesday rolls around and the excitement of new comics fills the air, it can prove hard to wait those extra few days.  That’s when I usually wander around Harvard Square during my lunch hour and inhabit Million Year Picnic, a quirky little hole-in-the-wall shop with cozy shelves and some super nice people running the register who clearly know their comics.  And when I went in there this week, the item I immediately grabbed for a quick read-through was Aquaman #1.

Laugh at me all you want, but I have a soft spot in my heart for Aquaman.  His was the first comic I’d ever read when I was a kid, secretly borrowing my brothers’ comics to read whenever they were out of the house.  I can get into the myriad reasons why I love Aquaman and will defend him ‘til the end, but that’s a topic for another post (which I’ve been working on for like six months and might never see the light of review day).  When DC announced this title, I was actually excited.  Aquaman!  What!?  And not belligerent old hook-hand Aquaman either—no!  This was the young, sexy blonde Aquaman that had made my tiny toddler heart skip a beat (he was so pretty!).  As I flipped through the pages gawking at the beautiful artwork and reading the story, I knew immediately that this would be one of few keepers for the New 52.

Geoff Johns loves Aquaman.  He’s proclaimed as much time and again during interviews, but you don’t need to hear him say that in order to get it.  Reading Aquaman #1 felt very much like Johns’ love letter to Aquaman.  He cares about this character, and we see that from page one.  The entire issue is devoted to building up Aquaman—first with a display of brute strength in the opening pages, followed by a glance at his reputation and insight to what’s in his heart, ultimately ending with a declaration of intent.  And in between it all, it is funny as heck.  I’m not sure a New 52 book has given me as much enjoyment yet as Aquaman did.  I loved this, and if Geoff and Ivan Reis (whose art was ridiculously great) can keep the momentum, I’ll be hooked for the long run.

Uh, no pun intended.

Batwoman #1Batwoman #1
Written by J.H. Williams & Haden Blackman
Illustrated by J.H. Williams
Price:  $2.99

 

I hate it when this happens.  You hear so much hype about a book—it’s built up and talked about everywhere and every review you read is like “THIS IS AMAZING!” and you think, oh my, I can’t wait to be hit with the awesome.  Then you get the book and … the balloon has popped.  To smithereens.  You’re deflated and your pieces are scattered everywhere, and you don’t feel like picking yourself back up.

That’s kind of how I felt after reading this issue.  Despite how gorgeous it was for the eyes—as though anyone would expect any less from J.H. Williams on that—it left me deflated.  Yet, I’m not really sure what my expectations were.  Story-wise, I had none.  I’m not a huge Kate Kane follower, but I liked her enough to sample this.  The only thing I left the issue with, though, was a sizeable dose of confusion.  I haven’t read Greg Rucka’s acclaimed run on Detective—the only Batwoman I’d read was the “zero” issue that came out last year or so—and as such, I had no frame of reference for a lot of what was happening in this book.  Whatever happened to “new reader-friendly”?

Could I follow along with this?  Yes.  I could piece together most of what I think I needed to know by the end of the issue.  But was it easy, or even rewarding?  Not really … I didn’t leave it feeling as such.  I’d like to blame that on the fact that J.H Williams, like many on the New 52, is artist-turned-writer.  That’s not an easy transition to make.  I’d also suggest that this title was never actually meant to be part of the New 52—it wasn’t written to entice new readership or be part of this comics-holy endeavor.  It was just a title that kept getting delayed and kept getting delayed and eventually found its way to being a part of this.  I think it’s done some harm.

I’m going to read issue two.  I’ll likely stick out the entire first arc, because I think whatever nitpicks I have with this can certainly be overcome.  I will say that the opening scenes in particular were incredible, and I’m looking for more of that to come.  Overall, the book just didn’t hit me the way I was expecting, and so much of that I’m sure has to do with the internet hype.  Drowning it out for next month.

Birds of Prey #1Birds of Prey #1
Written by Duane Swierczynski
Illustrated by Jesus Saiz
Price:  $2.99

 

Ugh.  I really … I didn’t want to do this.  I staunchly and adamantly shot down this book before it came out; very loudly voiced my hatred at the concept of a new Birds of Prey without Oracle or Huntress or Gail Simone behind the board.  I was NOT going to give this a shot.  But in a week where Catwoman and Starfire were degraded and exploited beyond all comprehension … suddenly, a female team book felt more alluring.  And really, let’s face it—I’m a masochist.  Comics fans in general are absolutely masochists.  We know it’s going to be bad—we know it’s going to hurt, but damn it, we just can’t look away.  We just can’t stop.

So I picked this up.  And … it broke my heart.

First of all, let me get this off my chest:  Dinah’s outfit is absolutely dumb.  Dumbest thing ever.  I will say that I’ve never minded the fishnets in her previous getup—I thought her outfit was fine, and no, I didn’t think she looked like a hooker.  I thought she looked like a badass biker chick, though much of fandom had complained that the fishnets were tacky.  DC’s answer to that, apparently, was to re-tool her costume and add even MORE fishnets?  Up her ARMS, no less?  What the hell, guys.  This is the stuff that makes me want to cuss my head off.  (I’m trying to tone it down—it isn’t easy.)  It’s just the most senseless outfit of all the redesigns, and that’s saying a lot considering there is some genuinely BAD stuff out there.  My eyes … they bleed.

Okay.  Now that I’ve gotten that out of the way, let’s talk about this book.  The Birds of Prey, to me, has always been about friendship.  Well, it’s about girls kicking ass too, but mostly, it’s friendship.  The unfailing, strong-in-the-face-of-all-danger, love-you-no-matter-how-many-times-you-screw-up friendship between Dinah and Barbara.  Then Huntress eventually came along and stirred the pot, and the book became even more amazing because the relationships built between the three women was not something that was found in any other DC book, or any other comic book period.  Add Zinda Blake to the mix, and things still kept getting stronger.  Four ladies, four unshakeable ties.  A family.  That was the Birds of Prey.  And I came back for it month after month after month, because it felt like these were my girls.  You find things you relate to and after so many years of a book like this, you build these immensely personal ties and attachment to it.  Not having the Birds anymore—my Birds—is heartwrenching.

This?  If they had called Duane Swierczynski’s version anything else—anything at all other than “Birds of Prey,” I might have actually been able to swallow this.  But I can’t.  I keep looking at this book hoping that it’s what it was—what I want it to be, but it’s not, and I’m not MEANT to look at it that way.  We’re supposed to look at it as something new.  It’s its own thing.  DC is asking us not to compare it to what came before.  But that’s really unfair, and it’s just not something I can do.  DC built this attachment of mine; they gave me a security blanket that I loved and loved, and they can’t expect me to throw it away for some new toy.

I’m genuinely sorry about it, too, because the artwork on this was flawless.  One issue and I am already a huge Jesus Saiz fan.  And as much as I wasn’t crazy about Swierczynski coming on board, I have to give credit where credit is due—he writes a pretty damn good Black Canary.  Maybe even second best to Gail.  Unfortunately, I won’t be sticking around to see what he can do.  He screwed that up for me the moment he introduced Barbara Gordon in this issue for no apparent reason whatsoever outside of raising a million continuity questions that he doesn’t proceed to answer.  I can’t look at this with the new eyes that it needs.  Maybe some day … but for right now, looks like I’m out.

Wonder Woman #1Wonder Woman #1
Written by Brian Azzarello
Illustrated by Cliff Chiang
Price:  $2.99

Yeeaaahhh … I have to say, I was really on the fence about this one.  I had no idea what to expect until a few weeks back when I watched this hysterical interview with Brian Azzarello about his run on the book.  He has such utter disdain for the interviewer in it and he’s so frank with his responses that I couldn’t help but be oddly endeared.  Suddenly, any worries I had about the title just kind of fell away.

Despite being turned off by the idea of yet another revamp for Wonder Woman, after over a year of horrible, pedantic, pointless WW issues during the “Odyssey” story arc of Straczynski’s ill-conceived run, I was suddenly DESPERATE for a title re-launch.  Time to kick the lame pants and jacket, adolescent writing, and cheesecake artwork to the curb.  Cliff Chiang on art duties?  GODSEND.  Brian Azzarello writing?  Er … I hadn’t read the guy.  There was a 50/50 chance this could work.

I liked this issue.  It took me two reads, but I liked it.  The first read through was a little rough—Azzarello wasn’t lying when he said he wanted to introduce a “horror” element to Wonder Woman, and at first, it just seemed like a whole bunch of violence and gore.  But on the second read through, the issue took a much better shape, and I caught things I didn’t catch the first time around.  The tone was different, and I actually liked it.  It was hard, but in a good way.  Azzarello re-introduces some of the Greek gods, and for the first time in a long time—maybe ever—they actually come across really cool, powerful, and scary.  When was the last time the gods were actually scary?  They SHOULD be scary.  It’s refreshing to see.  Especially interesting is the fact that this doesn’t feel as “mythological” as it actually is.  You’re not watching the gods walk around in togas and hang out on Olympus the way you did during Greg Rucka’s run (which I loved as well).  It’s not in-your-face ancient mythology.  It’s modern day, and it WORKS.  So much so that I’m surprised.

The story involves a human girl named Zola who has unknowingly gotten herself mixed up in godly affairs—literally—and it’s up to Wonder Woman to protect her from the wrath of who we presume to be Hera and Apollo.  I was very concerned with how Wonder Woman would come across under Azzarello’s pen.  Would she just be a violent Amazonian?  Would she retain any of her compassion?  Would she wear pants?  (Just kidding.)  My favorite renditions of Wonder Woman have always been the loving, empathetic ones—Simone’s and Rucka’s.  An overly violent Wonder Woman goes against the grain of everything the character represents.

That said, she isn’t afraid to kick ass when ass needs kicking.  She isn’t afraid to kill if it’s what must be done (see Maxwell Lord).  And in this issue, Wonder Woman kicks a lot of ass in what is one of the most well-choreographed, beautifully drawn fight scenes I’ve read in ages.  Cliff Chiang kills on this book, illustrating a Wonder Woman who isn’t afraid to get her hands dirty, but can also show concern where it’s called for.

Did this completely fire on all cylinders for me?  Not entirely.  I have a few nitpicks, to be sure—for example, this being her own title book, it felt oddly as though Wonder Woman somehow wasn’t in it very much.  I also wasn’t crazy about the use of her lasso in one scene, and I feel like some of the dialogue can be tweaked as we move forward.  But overall, this is a HUGE improvement over the garbage Wonder Woman fans have had to suffer through over the past year.  I am most definitely on board here, and the creative team has set my expectations high.  For the first time in a long time, I can’t wait for the next issue of Wonder Woman.


Catching Up on Comics, Big Bang Theory, Crying in My Morning Cheerios, and More

A lot going on lately (I hope everyone in the MA area was safe and sound last night during the crazy storms). I’ve desperately been trying to catch up on a pile of reading, but it’s going slowly, as Captain Couch has been wailing on me pretty hard the last couple of weeks. Our skirmishes have been truly terrible and I have some bruises to show for last night’s fight. My weapon of choice lately has been Chew—I’ve had the first three trades for a while and only recently cracked open the first one, and I LOVE it. Oh man, it’s so good. I’m halfway through volume two right now.

Who’s excited for X-Men: First Class opening this week? I want to be able to check it out some time this weekend; it looks like it has some good stuff going for it. My hopes are high. They’d better be playing it in 2D locally or I’m going to be very depressed.

DC Reboot

Speaking of depression … how about that big ol’ DC reboot that’s coming? So much of me wants to avoid acknowledging it because I’ll probably be reduced to a blubbering mess of tears in my cereal as more information comes out this morning, but EVERYONE else is saying something—despite my avoidant tendencies, I guess it can’t be ignored. That’s right, DC is starting all over again (YET again, yet again) and changing a heck of a lot of stuff. How much/what exactly? We’re still learning; so far I hear talk of a new Hawkman book, Aquaman, Captain Atom, and some other stuff that doesn’t interest me. The most depressing info by far is the fact that Gail Simone will no longer be writing Birds of Prey. I can’t even believe that. Ouch, it hurt me just to type. DC, why can’t we leave well enough alone? I guess Gail is teaming up with Ethan van Sciver for a Firestorm book instead (comicjunkie, you lucky bastard). And I don’t even want to know what the fate of Batgirl is going to be.
Also, this news, if true, is pretty stupid. Ugh. I’m currently an awkward amalgam of rage and despair.

And yet—one thing that’s offsetting my misery is The Big Bang Theory. Friends have been hounding me for ages to watch this and I finally subbed to it on Netflix a few weeks ago. I’m currently on season three and loving it. If you’re a comic book fan, you should be watching this show. Thank you, comic shop peeps! You know who you are!

Umm… what else did I want to touch on? Oh—that NBC Wonder Woman show has been canned. I’m not particularly heartbroken. If anyone happens to find a copy of the unaired pilot somewhere, please share—I’d like to see just how much pain I’m being spared.

Bazinga.”


Blurb Reviews!

I asked a few different people at the comic shop this week what they thought of Fear Itself #2.  The common response was “I don’t know.  Hammers?”

 

Birds of Prey #12Birds of Prey #12 – Gail Simone continues to effortlessly impress me, as this latest issue of Birds of Prey finds the ladies come face-to-face with a villain from Simone’s Secret Six.  I always love when a writer cross-references work from other titles to provide a sense of continuity, assuming it’s done well, and Simone has no problem incorporating one of her own creations here.  I’m eager to see how the Birds will handle the threat—after all, this group is far from being anything like the Six, and it’s a pretty ridiculous villain we’re talking about.  A few refreshing elements to this issue:  Zinda taking a more upfront role in the team’s current mission; Helena attempting to recruit and subsequently teaming up with The Question; and Hawk & Dove in the backseat of the story so far—the less of them, the better as far as I’m concerned.  I like this book to concentrate on its core members—Babs, Dinah, Helena, and Zinda.  Spotlight guests are welcome, but let’s keep them that way.  When it’s just those four, the story seems to flow better, the quips come easier, and the tone throws it back to the good old days of the Birds book.  Jesus Saiz comes on board for art duties here—I feel like I haven’t seen enough to really judge if I like him or not, but his stuff IS good.  I’m not sure why Birds of Prey has been given the finger as far as not having a steady artist—a book as stellar as this month after month should have some priority and artistic consistency—but hopefully things change now with Saiz in the hot seat.

 

Batgirl #21 – As much as I love Birds of Prey, these days I think I’m neverBatgirl #21 happier than when I’m reading Batgirl.  I love this book SO MUCH.  I love Stephanie Brown, I love Bryan Q. Miller’s writing, I love the unapologetic humor, the fantastic artwork by Dustin Nguyen, the overall happy-go-lucky, FUN tone of this book.  How I went so long before this title without Stephanie Brown in my life is a mystery to me, and the awesomeness that makes Batgirl what it is just continues to flourish with each story arc.  Issue #21 continues Stephanie’s fight against The Order of the Scythe as she engages their newest member, Harmony.  Not only does she have to deal with new foes, however; she’s also losing some allies.  With Barbara stepping away from her Oracle persona, Proxy also breaking the news that she’s heading out on her own search for self-discovery, and the Grey Goose “betraying” Steph (though unbeknownst to her and, frankly, probably welcome), they’re dropping like flies.  I love Bryan Q. Miller using the Goose’s obnoxious persona as a mirror to how Steph herself began as the arguably annoying Spoiler—it works hilariously well.  What DOESN’T work well is what I propose to be this sense of urgency Miller has tried to build up over Proxy and her decision to leave team Batgirl.  I don’t know enough about Proxy to really care or empathize; quite frankly, I’m kind of excited to see her go.  Let’s focus this back on Batgirl and let her awesomeness shine on its own.  It’s what got me into this book, and it’s what will keep me here.

 

Amazing Spider-Man #661Amazing Spider-Man #661 – I don’t read any Spider-Man titles on a regular basis; rather, I pick them up here and there when something catches my eye or sounds interesting.  I wasn’t planning on reading this issue until my ever-hilarious friend and sometimes co-worker Dario urged me to check it out.  I’m so, so glad he did, because this issue was … um, “Amazing.”  Christos Gage temporarily takes over the writing duties, and he does a damn fine job—I was laughing out loud on almost every page as Spider-Man attempted to substitute teach Hank Pym’s problem children.  Sampling the work here has made me want to check out his Avengers Academy; I’ll definitely be going back and picking up the first trade now.  You know when you get into a stretch where you just seem to pick up bad issue after bad issue after bad issue of titles, and you get to a point where you’re like “Geez, do good writers EXIST anymore, or is it all just a world of Judd Winicks and Matt Fractions”?  Then you pick up a Mike Carey or a Gail Simone and it’s THEN that you remember why you read comics in the first place.  Your faith in the medium is restored.  This is what this issue of Spider-Man was for me:  faith-renewing.  Thank you, Mr. Gage.

Captain America and the First Thirteen #1 (One-Shot) I’ve beenCaptain America and the First Thirteen #1 waiting for this one-shot for months, not realizing it had come out in March.  Woops.  Well, I guess I don’t mind the wait, because it wound up being pretty good.  The ingredients are all there—Cap, Peggy Carter, wonderful artwork, and Kathryn Immonen doing the writing?  That’s a win.  We get a backstory here set during Cap’s time with the Resistance.  It’s one of those stories that, although arguably “unessential” for our knowledge of the continuity, still adds a unique layer to the characters and their relationship that the reader may not have gotten otherwise.  There’s war, drama, strong women, humor, and smart lines left and right.  Some might call it a “throw away;” I call it an entertaining read that gets me even more excited for the upcoming Cap movie.  Ch-check it out!

 

X-Men: Legacy #248 – This is THE X-Men title to read.  The rest is toilet paper.

 

X-Men Prelude to Schism #1X-Men: Prelude to Schism #1 & 2 – Ummm … what?  What the hell is this junk?  Oh my God.  Aforementioned faith is once again destroyed.  I quit comics … (for the third time this week).  Okay, seriously—this is such an utterly pointless mini.  Issue two was a carbon copy of issue one, and neither part bothers to accomplish anything aside from attempting to illustrate Cyclops as some sort of savior to mutantkind.  I say “attempting to” because what it ACTUALLY accomplishes is just a bunch of whining.  This is two issues worth of Cyclops trying to make a decision—a decision on what, you ask?  We don’t know!  You aren’t going to be told, dear reader—and the best part is we have still another two issues left to go.  Don’t waste your time with this.  If you’re looking for a worthwhile X-book event to read, go back and pick up Mike Carey’s Age of X storyline in X-Men: Legacy.  You need Prelude to Schism the way you need syphilis.


Blurb Reviews

I wrote you all what I thought was a witty write-up on PAX East, but my computer apparently liked it so much that it ate it.  I apologize that I don’t have the patience to re-create from memory what was quite a long post, so I offer you blurb reviews in its place.  Not quite the same, I know, but we make do with what we have.  Off we go!

Ruse #1Ruse #1
Written by Mark Waid
Illustrated by Mirco Pierfederici

I’ve never read the original Ruse title, or any other Crossgen series for that matter.  But when I heard about this book coming back along with Sigil under Marvel’s takeover of Crossgen as an imprint, I figured there wouldn’t be a better time for me to jump in, and Ruse sounded pretty intriguing from the solicits.  The first issue didn’t let me down, and I liked that it was easy to get into as a new reader without needing to look up years of back story.  I like Mark Waid’s manner of storytelling, and the artwork creates a great tone for the book as we follow a grand detective and his “assistant” (small joke) solve a murder.  Waid opens the book right in the thick of things, and it only gets better from there.  I have to say, I was a little worried that the female character in this series was going to come off as some helpless, futile figure only along for the sake of “bettering” the male character.  My fears aren’t entirely subsided from the first issue—but there’s reason for hope.  I’m on board.

Avengers: Children's Crusade Young Avengers #1Avengers: Children’s Crusade Young Avengers #1
Written by Allan Heinberg
Illustrated by Alan Davis & Mark Farmer

When I first saw the solicitation for this in Previews, my reaction was something along the lines of “OMG ANOTHER ONE WHAT THE HELL I HATE YOU MARVEL.”  I really didn’t, and still don’t, see a reason for this issue to exist, other than to try to fill the absurd gap between current issues of Children’s Crusade, and even then, it’s pointless.  Also, what’s with the title?  That’s honestly the best they could come up with?  You shock me, guys.  Anyway, if you’re reading Children’s Crusade, you can pretty much skip over this entirely with no consequences whatsoever.  The only thing we learn from this one-shot is that Kang the Conqueror (Iron Lad of the future) tricks his past/current self (Iron Lad of the present) to go back and try to stop the Young Avengers from rescuing the Scarlet Witch so that they don’t get killed by the real Avengers … or something like that.  Yeah, I can’t even explain it, basically because it makes no sense and has no value to the story whatsoever.  Cheap gimmicks all around.  Also not a fan of Davis’ art.  Avoid this like the plague, but pick up the next issue of Children’s Crusade (which I have yet to get to).

Captain America & the Secret Avengers #1Captain America and the Secret Avengers #1
Written by Kelly Sue Deconnick
Illustrated by Greg Tocchini

I’m still debating how I feel about this one.  You know what?  It really wasn’t bad.  It wasn’t the BEST thing I’ve read lately, not by a long shot, but it was entertaining and kind of a breezy read.  I like the duo of Black Widow and Agent 13, and I loved the comedic and witty interplay instituted by Deconnick.  It’s a bit campy, a bit short, but overall a different flavor to the other books in the pile.  Natasha and Sharon Carter walk into a trap in order to rescue a girl from … um … some other girls.  Trained assassins.  Hi-jinks ensue.  Witty comebacks are delivered.  And Steve Rogers is stuck at a desk doing paperwork while the ladies are out there rather swiftly kicking some ass.  The art is a bit stylized and “sketchy” as opposed to “clean,” which worked for me.  Hmm.  I’ve decided I like this.  It’s a one-shot, and that’s enough.

Birds of Prey #11Birds of Prey #11
Written by Gail Simone
Illustrated by Pere Perez

*High-pitched voice* AWESOMENEEESSSSSSSSSSS!  I read this during my train commute in the ungodly hours of the morning, half groggy when I opened to the first page.  It quickly woke me up.  This story was not at all what I expected, particularly by the end.  One look at that front cover and you’re kind of sick from all the hearts, right?  But don’t judge a book—at least, THIS book—by its cover.  This is a one-issue story, and in it, Gail Simone crafts yet another tale of action peppered with comedy, a little bit of tenderness, and some seriously solid badassery (sans Hawk and Dove, which was admittedly a nice breather).  I’ll tell you what we have here:  a jewel heist.  A hostage.  A tense romance.  A full-grown man in a cat suit.  And, come the final pages, one seriously pissed off Huntress.  It shouldn’t need any more convincing than that.  PICK THIS UP!

Nonplayer #1Nonplayer #1
Written & Illustrated by Nate Simpson

Wow.  First of all, this was gorgeous.  Absolutely beautiful to look at—eye candy in a pure sense, rather than the usual cheesecake sense.  Do you ever read a comic where you’re stuck looking at the same page—same panel—for minutes on end, just to make sure you’ve caught all the details and intricacies?  That’s what this book was like.  I’d read a lot of hype online about this miniseries, and I was hooked on the “MMO” angle it sounded like it was going to take.  It’s actually so much more than that, though.  The story is set a world apart from the one we know, and it’s clear by the first issue that the gaming setting is going to be secondary to what’s really happening here.  The notion that this is Nate Simpson’s first comic work is surprising—his simple, direct writing and his artistic layouts are spectacular and echo the experience of someone who you’d think has been in the industry for a while.  Hopeful that the rest of the series continues this level of excellence.  The book is already on a second printing; definitely check this one out if you can get your hands on it.


Blurb Reviews

Only three today; I did very little reading over the holiday break aside from working through some Fables trades, and I’m woefully behind on all the new stuff that’s come out in recent weeks.  Bear with me as I try to fill some holes in my collection and get somewhat up-to-date.  I hope everyone had a safe, warm, and lovely holiday.

Birds of Prey #7Birds of Prey #7 – Aww, this issue broke my heart a little.  This title has been consistently excellent (I usually avoid reviewing it because I would just be going “YAY THIS IS AMAZING I LOVE BIRDS OF PREY HOORAY GAIL SIMONE” every month), and #7 is no kink in the chain.  The usual mix of action, humor, drama, and intrigue, this issue finds Bruce Wayne Batman (so funny that we have to distinguish which Batman we’re talking about these days) checking in on Oracle, who proceeds to take him on a tour of her new headquarters.  There’s also some fuel to the “DC is killing off Oracle” rumors, but it’s not exactly what you think, and I’m interested to see if it goes where I predicted it would in Barbara simply taking on a different mantle.  Best scene in the issue involves the Birds on a night out—any time Zinda’s got a beer in her hands, you can guarantee hilarity.  My only peeve with this book right now is the fact that every single issue has to introduce all the characters over and over and over again:  “Black Canary.  Dinah Lance.  Devastating sonic scream.  Blah blah blah.”  All right, editorial, we get it.  Can we leave the new-reader-friendly intros to just the first issue of each new arc and leave them there?  Thanks.
Birds of Prey #8 is due out this Wednesday; I’ll be doing my happy dance.

Avengers: Children's Crusade #4Young Avengers Children’s Crusade #4 (of 9) – I really, really, really want to hate this book.  I want to hate it because it’s absurdly late, and I feel neglected as a consumer.  I feel like Heinberg and Marvel are going to take their sweet time, regardless of promises.  I want to hate them for that, and I want to not buy this book.  But … oh, it’s just so good.  I just love it.  Issue four finds Wiccan up against Doctor Doom; an amnesiac Scarlet Witch without her powers and about to be wed; a ticked-off Wolverine seconds away from killing her once and for all, and the surprise re-emergence of a character I did not see coming at all.  This mini is apparently worth the agonizing amount of time it’s taking to publish, because it’s clever and FUN and entertaining and … it’s FUN!  It’s a lot of what most comics are missing these days.  There’s a real PLOT that is actually FOLLOWED.  There’s exposition and dialogue that come together to–*gasp*–give CHARACTER.  And have I mentioned that it’s fun?  Quite frankly, I need more Young Avengers in my life.  This book is awesome.  Go buy it right now.

 

Wonder Woman #605Wonder Woman #whatever because I don’t care about this book to keep track anymore – It’s sad, really.  To go from such a high in the preceding review to … this.  Sweet Jesus, I don’t know why I’m still reading.  WHY am I still reading?!  I just can’t stop.  Just when I think it couldn’t POSSIBLY get any worse—just when I thought Phil Hester was bound to clean things up, I am proven so utterly, completely, hideously wrong with this issue.  What plunging depths of horribleness will we reach, I wonder?  Better yet, how is this even happening?  In this issue, Wonder Woman:

– Threatens to beat up/gets in a fight with a store clerk
– Steals a significant amount of money
– Listens to heavy metal?  (While there’s nothing wrong with this music, it’s just not an image I associate with Wonder Woman.)
– Consistently encourages violence and revenge.  Whhaaaa?

Why, I ask, are the words “Wonder Woman” still being displayed across the title page of this book?  I understand she’s basically a “different character” with a different back story and continuity here (thanks again, JMS), but … whhaaaa?  Why, in her CORE AND ONLY BOOK, are we delving even further and further away from what makes Diana different from other superheroes, as opposed to a carbon copy of every other angsty teenager DC already has in their arsenal?  Why are we delving further away from who she is?  Couldn’t DC have done an “Ultimate” version of Wonder Woman—call it “All-Star” or whatever other line you want to give it, and leave the Wonder Woman we all know and love alone in her main title for those of us who appreciate her?  I might have been able to tolerate this version if I knew she wasn’t the only version currently available to me.  I feel like I keep asking the same questions over and over.  Why is Diana still the only one of the Big Three who doesn’t have more than one title?  Wasn’t this the perfect chance for that?  How do DC expect to encourage love for a character by completely changing every aspect of her personality?  Have we learned nothing from the disaster that was mod squad Wonder Woman?  I’m not even going to touch on my myriad other complaints.  My only shred of hope here is the fact that the plot alluded to a very slight possibility of things eventually returning to normal, and I am beside myself with the desire for that to happen.  I just don’t think I can hold my breath long enough.

Sigh.  I need something cool to wash away the bad taste left in my mouth after that last review.  So here’s this:

 Dinosaur Comics

From Dinosaur Comics, with thanks to my friend Jon for pointing it out.